REVIVING THE CURRICULUM: CHALLENGES AND ACHIEVEMENTS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BAGHDAD UNIVERSITY

Hilal Al Saffar, Batool Ali Ghalib, Hudal Al Kateeb, Sabeeh Al Mashahadani, Hedef Al Yassin, Noor Sadee, Ahmed Samir Al Nuaimy

Abstract


College of medicine, Baghdad University, is one of the oldest medical schools in the Middle East. It was founded in 1927 with the first dean being a British scientist and physician to the Royal family of Iraq, Sir Harry Sanderson. It played a major role in the establishment of the modern Iraqi healthcare system and provided a pipeline of physicians, some of whom became distinguished professors and consultants in their own right.

During its glorious days, Baghdad College of Medicine was highly regarded among other medical schools in the region where students from countries like Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, UAE and Sudan received their medical degrees. Its graduates were sought after for postgraduate training in many European and American Universities. Unfortunately its glory dwindled down in the early 1980s because of the tight international embargo and the successive wars that befell Iraq, leaving a major negative impact on the medical education in Iraq.

Since its inception, Baghdad College of Medicine implemented very few changes in its curriculum that was originally adopted from the University of Edinburgh some 80 years earlier. Reviving our curriculum became a must to be able to win the regional and the international accreditation required to train the next generation of knowledgeable, highly skilled physicians so direly needed in Iraq today.


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